Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Glocal #2 Thinking Globally Acting Locally

Carra, What a difference you are making on this journey! We all need to take a deep breath and then go read each of  your links. I can certainly see why you were in tears on several occasions today.  Your emotions must be on overload as you inhale the knowledge around you. Please continue to share with us. Every word is being read and appreciated.

Continue to be safe on your travels.
 
Via Carra Riley CRB, CRS, GRI (Author, Speaker, Consultant, Second Homes AZ LLC):
Thinking Globally Acting Locally is the theme of the Spring 2011 Semester at Sea Voyage. The participants are learning about the new term "glocal."  Taking the lessons we are learning from around the globe and applying the message to our local community is taking us "glocal."
Traveling around the world with a group of 605 college students, 66 lifelong learners and 70 TOP EDUCATORS has built up HIGH expectations of a “transformational” voyage. Speaking with new people every day at meal time creates opportunities to learn and share with one another like none other we have ever experienced.  Taking classes, observing in the Field  Programs, listening to speakers who are on the ship to share how they are making a difference in the world one  person at at time and explaining how they accomplished it leaves little time to post on my blog and process all that is going on. Today we had a message that moved me to tears at least three times.
JEFFREY A. KOTTLER, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology was our speaker in Global Studies class today.
Jeffrey A. KottlerHe  has written over 80 books including a recent New York Times best seller  “The Last Victim: Inside the Minds of Serial Killers”  which is now a movie produced by Clark Peterson who also produced the film, Monster. The film “Dear Mr. Gacy” earned an Academy Award for best actress.
The thought provoking question of the day for me was:
“Would you sell your daughter to avoid starving?”
Most people reading this post will never have to answer that question but there are millions around the world that have to make the decision on a daily basis.
  • The average family in Nepal makes only $210 per year.
  • The cost to buy uniforms and eat at school is $50.00 per year.
  • A family with 4 or 5 children has to decide who can go to school and survive and who will have to be “taken by an employer” to survive on their own.
  • The parent does not know what will become of the girls “taken by an employer” they are simply hoping they can eat.
  • The life span of a girl taken into “sex slavery” by an “employer”  is about 3 years before they die from aids.
  • Many of the girls are raped 10 to 12 times on their first day in service.
  • Men with aids in the culture think that having sex with a virgin could possibly cure them of aids.
Dr. Kottler spoke on “Promoting Social Justice.” His accounts of helping save the lives of two specific girls are an inspiration to all.  Now through his program he is helping over 150 Nepali girls and keeping them from "disappearing" into sex slavery.  $50.00 initially saved Inu Pavivar from being sold into sex slavery and allowed her to attend school in her village. Her story stimulated a movement called “Empower Nepali Girls Foundation.”  Dr. Kottler ultimately had to go back each year to check on her to make sure the $50.00 was being spent on her education and NOT lining the pockets of some other entity.  This is a true success story and now….
Inu ParivarInu Pariyar, our first student to receive a university scholarship, working in the media and radio studio at Rangsit University in Thailand. She is studying communication and media, fields that are especially impoverished in her own country of Nepal.”
The life of another young girl with a deadly infection on her face was saved for $14.00. Dr. Kottler’s message helped us see how important small donations can be when they are given to the right organizations.   Read more details at Empower Nepali Girls Foundation.
More important facts:
* Facebook group is open to join: Empower Nepali Girls Foundation
* Empower Nepali Girls Foundation is a grassroots in that we have no paid staff and no office.  Everyone pays their own expenses; that means that 90% of money donated goes DIRECTLY to keep a lower caste girl in school and prevents her being sold into sex slavery.
* There are 12,000 Nepali girls each year sold into slavery.
*  The foundation visits every girl’s home, every year to make sure she’s okay, has enough to eat, and that        her family supports the education.
*  The group is currently supporting over 150 girls
*  $125 keeps a girl in primary or secondary school for a year!
*  As the girls get older and begin university and technical and medical school, the cost jumps to about $3,000 per girl per year.
The group operates in 9 different villages in the most remote, neglected parts of the country of Nepal.
Empowering Nepali Girls
Jeffery Kottler Ph.D. asks introspective questions that when answered might help change the world:
“What is it that leads people to help others, even when they do so at great personal sacrifice?
What is it that motivates you to reach out to others in need?
How are those involved in social justice and altruistic projects transformed by their experiences?”
PLEASE, access all the links in this post and discover how rewarding it is to serve others and think about how you can make a difference in your own community or around the world. Thinking globally Acting Locally.
  • When you give your time and energy you are sharing an integral part of yourself.
  • You are helping people who are not part of a tribe.
  • It is hard work and a selfless act taking your time and energy to give to others.
Thank you, JEFFREY A. KOTTLER, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Spring 2011Semester at Sea for showing us the way that one person can make a huge difference.
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